Chewsday Review - Weet-Bix Wild Berry Bites

Weet-Bix are a pantry staple in this household, and I used to like Weet-Bix Go Mini’s for a snack before they were discontinued. Let’s see how another sibling, Weet-Bix Bites, stack up against the rest of the Weet-bix family.


🔹 Ingredients

🔸 Wholegrain wheat (68%), sugar, invert sugar, humectant (glycerol), berry purees (3%) (strawberry, blackcurrant, raspberry, blueberry), honey, salt, wheat fibre, flavours, barley malt extract, gelling agent (pectin), acid (malic, citric), vitamins (niacin, thiamin, riboflavin, folate), mineral (iron).

🔸 About two thirds of this is wholegrain wheat, but the second and third ingredients are added sugar.

🔸 Fortified with several B vitamins, folate and iron.

🔸 For a wild berry flavour, it’s disappointing to see these are only 3% fruit puree.

🔸 Allergens: Wheat (Gluten)

🔸 May contain: Lupin

🔹 Positives

🔸 Added iron! One serving (45 g) provides 3 mg of iron, which is about a third of recommended daily intake for toddlers and children (aged 1-4, and 4-13), and the same as 2 regular Weet-Bix.

🔸 There is 3.8 g of fibre per serve, which similar to regular Weet-Bix. This comes to almost 30% of a toddler’s, roughly 20% of a young child’s (4-8 years) daily fibre target.

🔸 Within guidelines for sodium, and total and saturated fat.

🔹 Negatives

🔸 Sugar is above recommendations at 21.8 g per 100 g. This is much more than regular Weet-Bix (3.0 g/ 100g), low sugar Cheerios (4.1 g/ 100g) and original Cheerios (14.6 g/ 100g), but still much less than Coco Pops (32.3 g/ 100g) and Froot Loops (38.8 g/ 100g). The Weet-Bix Bites do contain fruit, but only 3% berry puree so most of this is coming from the added sugars.


🔹 Marketing

🔸 “68% Wholegrains”. True, but regular Weet-Bix are 97% wholegrains.

🔸 “Bite-sized Weet-bix”. I mean… not strictly true. They are pretty similar in terms of fibre and iron content, but much higher in added sugar.

🔸 “Fills you up!”. This obviously depends on how much you eat and how hungry you are, but the fibre will help.

🔹 Alternatives

🔸 I don’t love these as a regular brekkie cereal, mostly because of the higher added sugar levels. My go-tos are still Weet-Bix or oats, but these could be crushed slightly and used as breakfast sprinkles to add interest.

🔸 I like these for their iron and fibre content, and they make a decent lunchbox snack compared to many other packaged snacks. The added iron is especially good for kids who aren’t keen on typical iron foods like meats, legumes and nuts.

 

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About Mealtime Building Blocks

Dr Kyla Smith is a paediatric dietitian specialising in fussy eating, feeding difficulties and childhood nutrition. Lauren Pike is an occupational therapist working in fussy eating and feeding difficulties. They have a private practice called Mealtime Building Blocks in Perth, Western Australia. You can connect with Kyla and Lauren here www.mealtimebuildingblocks.com.au





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